Runway 13/31 Rehabilitation at YWG

Regular runway inspections have indicated normal pavement wear that requires rehabilitation. Runway rehabilitation will begin April 22, 2019 and is expected to be complete by September 2019.

Runway 13/31 was last closed in 2001 for similar repairs. The typical lifespan for this type of repair is 10 to 15 years, but WAA has been able to defer this work due to a comprehensive maintenance program.

WAA is working with our airline partners to ensure that all flights are accommodated during the construction. During this project, all flights will be using Runway 18/36, the airport’s other runway.

While some noise is unavoidable at our airport, WAA has a program in place to reduce noise disturbances. The Aeronautical Noise Management Program is overseen by the federal Minister of Transport, and sets noise certification requirements for all jet aircrafts in consultation with the international community.

We will continue implementing noise abatement procedures for departure and arrival altitudes, nighttime operating restrictions and more in order to reduce impacts. However, if you experience any extraordinary noise disturbances, please call the 24-Hour Noise Line: 204.987.9403 or email construction@waa.ca.

To answer some of the most common questions we get, here are some FAQs:

What work is currently underway?
On April 22, 2019, Winnipeg Richardson International Airport will temporarily close one of its two runways (Runway 13/31) in order to restore and enhance it. The work includes significant pavement repairs and drainage restoration.

Shutting it down means that the airport will continue with normal operations, and the flight paths of arriving and departing planes will be temporarily altered to solely use the remaining runway (Runway 18/36).

Why is this work being done?
Runways across Canada act as major roads for aircraft and like city roads, they deteriorate over time. Airport runways are not only held to higher standards, but they also endure harsher environments because safety concerns require them to be clear at all times. That means more chemicals, more salt and more cleaning machinery are part of its regular load.

On average, airports across Canada need to do this work every 10 to 15 years to maintain the integrity of their infrastructure.

What is the impact and who is affected by this work?
While many communities will see a reduction in overhead flights, there will be an increased frequency of overhead flights in specific areas. This has the effect of increasing aircraft-related noise in those areas.

Temporary Decrease in Overhead Air Traffic:

  • Fort Garry-Riverview
  • Fort Richmond
  • Fort Rouge (west)
  • Fort Whyte (northeast)
  • Headingley
  • Riel
  • River Heights
  • Seine River
  • Southdale
  • St. François-Xavier
  • St. James (east)
  • St. Vital
  • Tuxedo (east)
  • Wolseley (west)

Temporary Increase in Overhead Air Traffic:

  • Assiniboia (east)
  • Charleswood
  • Kirkfield Park (east)
  • The Maples (west)
  • Roblin Park (east)
  • Rosser (east)
  • St. James (west)
  • Stonewall
  • Tuxedo (west)
  • Tyndall Park (west)

Will any flights be affected by this work?
While the airport will continue with normal operations during the runway rehabilitation, we expect that there could be impacts to travel on severe weather days, e.g. extreme winds. Safety is paramount to travel at our airport, and we will do our best to ensure your journey continues as planned. Please check your flight status with your airline and watch WAA.ca for travel updates closer to your scheduled flight.

How long will it take?
Runway rehabilitation will be complete by September 2019 and involves around-the-clock construction as part of the project scope.

Where can I learn more?
Being a good neighbour means having open lines of communication. You can reach us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to learn more and stay up to date on travel alerts during this construction season. Feel free to also reach out at construction@waa.ca.

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Comments

Nash Soonawala said:

My house is in west Tuxedo, less than kilometre east of the flight path of the north-south runway. If the airplanes stick to a straight south flight path it's not too bad. But many planes veer east quite early, probably those headed for Toronto. That puts them directly over us. I understand they are supposed to fly straight south until the perimeter but many don't do that. That guideline should be strictly enforced. And many small aircraft don't care at all. They come in from the North and if there is north wind turn around right over us before lining up for the landing in the north direction. If WAA took care of these problems, it would help a lot.

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